False Bay #1     This aerial view depicts the former separate amenities of Strandfontein Pavilion, Mnandi Resort, Monwabisi Resort and Macassar Resort. This stretch of coast, notorious for dangerous swimming conditions, was divided into sections for ‘black’ and ‘coloured’ recreation during apartheid.   2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 92.5 inches

False Bay #1

This aerial view depicts the former separate amenities of Strandfontein Pavilion, Mnandi Resort, Monwabisi Resort and Macassar Resort. This stretch of coast, notorious for dangerous swimming conditions, was divided into sections for ‘black’ and ‘coloured’ recreation during apartheid.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 92.5 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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      Monwabisi Resort #1     Monwabisi Resort, which translates as ‘The one who makes you happy’ from Nguni, was reserved for ‘Bantu’ recreation in the Cape Peninsula during apartheid. The breakwater was built to prevent drowning in the treacherous False Bay currents. It was unsuccessful.   2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Monwabisi Resort #1

Monwabisi Resort, which translates as ‘The one who makes you happy’ from Nguni, was reserved for ‘Bantu’ recreation in the Cape Peninsula during apartheid. The breakwater was built to prevent drowning in the treacherous False Bay currents. It was unsuccessful.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Mnandi Resort      Previously reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘black’ population under apartheid, Mnandi (very nice – Translation from Nguni) beach was sectioned off as ‘bantu’ recreation intended for the growing township of Khayelitsha.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 92.5 inches

Mnandi Resort

Previously reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘black’ population under apartheid, Mnandi (very nice – Translation from Nguni) beach was sectioned off as ‘bantu’ recreation intended for the growing township of Khayelitsha.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 92.5 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    ATKV Playground     The ATKV (Afrikaans Language and Culture Association) still owns a substantial part of Hartenbos today. The facilities were reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid.   2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

ATKV Playground

The ATKV (Afrikaans Language and Culture Association) still owns a substantial part of Hartenbos today. The facilities were reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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      Oudekraal      Despite being previously reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid, Oudekraal, situated between Camps Bay and Llandudno, was often illegally used by ‘coloured’ families at this time.   2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Oudekraal

Despite being previously reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid, Oudekraal, situated between Camps Bay and Llandudno, was often illegally used by ‘coloured’ families at this time.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Green Point Common     This area of Green Point was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid. This site was used as a grazing area for the cattle of the Huri-!Xai Quena and Kurin gai-Quena tribes during pre-colonial times. Recently it was inhabited by homeless people who were removed in order to make way for the 2010 FIFA World Cup Stadium.      
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Green Point Common

This area of Green Point was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid. This site was used as a grazing area for the cattle of the Huri-!Xai Quena and Kurin gai-Quena tribes during pre-colonial times. Recently it was inhabited by homeless people who were removed in order to make way for the 2010 FIFA World Cup Stadium. 

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   Harmony Park Pavilion #1     Harmony Park, built in 1989, was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population of the Cape Flats during apartheid. It is situated between the Greenways golf course in Strand, and the Harbour Island Yacht facilities.   2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 79 inches

Harmony Park Pavilion #1

Harmony Park, built in 1989, was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population of the Cape Flats during apartheid. It is situated between the Greenways golf course in Strand, and the Harbour Island Yacht facilities.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 79 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Strandfontein Pavilion     The largest tidal pool in the Southern Hemisphere reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population and was designed to service the populations of Mitchells Plain and Strandfontein under apartheid.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Strandfontein Pavilion

The largest tidal pool in the Southern Hemisphere reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population and was designed to service the populations of Mitchells Plain and Strandfontein under apartheid.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Wild Waters     Facing north towards O.R. Thambo International Airport this water park in Boksburg was reserved for the use of the ‘white’ population during the apartheid era.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Wild Waters

Facing north towards O.R. Thambo International Airport this water park in Boksburg was reserved for the use of the ‘white’ population during the apartheid era.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Harmony Park Pavilion #2     Situated 2,5 km from the previously ‘white’ beaches of Strand, Harmony Park was reserved for the use of the ‘coloured’ population during apartheid under the Reservation of Separate Amenities Act of 1953.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Harmony Park Pavilion #2

Situated 2,5 km from the previously ‘white’ beaches of Strand, Harmony Park was reserved for the use of the ‘coloured’ population during apartheid under the Reservation of Separate Amenities Act of 1953.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Maidens Cove.     Situated between Clifton and Camps Bay, Maidens Cove was one of the few beaches previously reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population on the Atlantic Seaboard. During apartheid a fence was erected between Maidens Cove and Bachelors Cove (a beach used by the homosexual community) as a means of keeping these two groups separate.      
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Maidens Cove.

Situated between Clifton and Camps Bay, Maidens Cove was one of the few beaches previously reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population on the Atlantic Seaboard. During apartheid a fence was erected between Maidens Cove and Bachelors Cove (a beach used by the homosexual community) as a means of keeping these two groups separate. 

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Silverstroomstrand     Reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population on the West Coast during apartheid, this view faces the bus terminal used to transport residents from Atlantis and Mamre to the beach, in order to control the movement of the visitors.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Silverstroomstrand

Reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population on the West Coast during apartheid, this view faces the bus terminal used to transport residents from Atlantis and Mamre to the beach, in order to control the movement of the visitors.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Kings Beach.     The industrial port of Port Elizabeth was used as a buffer zone between the beach reserved for the ‘black’ population to the north, and all beaches south of the coal depot which were previously reserved for the exclusive use of ‘white’ people under apartheid.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Kings Beach.

The industrial port of Port Elizabeth was used as a buffer zone between the beach reserved for the ‘black’ population to the north, and all beaches south of the coal depot which were previously reserved for the exclusive use of ‘white’ people under apartheid.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Greenpoint Stadium      The stadium is situated on Green Point Common, which was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid. In 1968 the Cape Town New Year Carnival was banned from the Green Point Stadium as it was seen as a ‘coloured’ activity.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Greenpoint Stadium

 The stadium is situated on Green Point Common, which was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid. In 1968 the Cape Town New Year Carnival was banned from the Green Point Stadium as it was seen as a ‘coloured’ activity.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Soetwater Resort.      Occupying a narrow strip of land between the sea and Slangkop lighthouse, Soetwater resort was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population during apartheid. This resort was more recently used to provide shelter for people during the xenophobic attacks of 2009.      2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Soetwater Resort.

Occupying a narrow strip of land between the sea and Slangkop lighthouse, Soetwater resort was reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘coloured’ population during apartheid. This resort was more recently used to provide shelter for people during the xenophobic attacks of 2009.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Shareworld Resort     Facing westwards from Soccer City and surrounded by the Crown Mines dump, this area was originally intended as a water park for the exclusive use of the ‘black’ population   of Soweto during apartheid. Shareworld was never completed.     
  
 
  
    
  
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    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Shareworld Resort

Facing westwards from Soccer City and surrounded by the Crown Mines dump, this area was originally intended as a water park for the exclusive use of the ‘black’ population of Soweto during apartheid. Shareworld was never completed.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

   Monwabisi Resort #2     This picnic area in Monwabisi was built in 1986 as a recreational area for the ’black’ population of Khayelitsha.    2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 79 inches

Monwabisi Resort #2

This picnic area in Monwabisi was built in 1986 as a recreational area for the ’black’ population of Khayelitsha. 

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 79 inches

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Buffelsbay     Formerly reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid, the three neighbouring beaches at Cape Point in the Table Mountain National Park were previously separated into ‘black’, ‘white’ and ‘coloured’ beaches. One of the commemorative crosses to honour Bartholomew Dias was erected overlooking the previously ‘coloured’ Bordjiesrif beach, situated next to Buffelsbay.      2011  Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper  31.5 x 39 inches

Buffelsbay

Formerly reserved for the exclusive use of the ‘white’ population during apartheid, the three neighbouring beaches at Cape Point in the Table Mountain National Park were previously separated into ‘black’, ‘white’ and ‘coloured’ beaches. One of the commemorative crosses to honour Bartholomew Dias was erected overlooking the previously ‘coloured’ Bordjiesrif beach, situated next to Buffelsbay.

2011

Archival Pigment Ink on Cotton Paper

31.5 x 39 inches

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